BBQ Thread

Sheik

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@Iamtdg

Was it you that had or have that masterbuilt electric smoker?

How many times did you have to load wood chips if you’re smoking for 3-4 hours at 230 degrees? Once? Once an hour? These directions are not helpful.

If that was you. If it wasn’t, then forget I asked and just move on, pal.
 

Sheik

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I have a Master Forge. I love it. The only thing I wish I could change is I wish I had bought one with the see-thru door. Other than that, it is awesome. I can smoke 2 large hams at a time on it or 3 chickens.


This one. It’s similar to what I have, but I got the see-thru door you desired, and a different brand.

Was it electric or propane?
 

Iamtdg

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This one. It’s similar to what I have, but I got the see-thru door you desired, and a different brand.

Was it electric or propane?
Electric, and I would have to drop more chips about once an hour.
 

Plan9Misfit

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Ever had Katz's pastrami?

If so, how does yours compare?
Of course I have. My grandparents lived in Ridgefield, NJ which is 10 minutes (if that) from the Lincoln Tunnel.

I think that the flavor of my pastrami is better, but theirs is more moist because they have restaurant/commercial steamers, which I don’t have.
 

yimyammer

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Of course I have. My grandparents lived in Ridgefield, NJ which is 10 minutes (if that) from the Lincoln Tunnel.

I think that the flavor of my pastrami is better, but theirs is more moist because they have restaurant/commercial steamers, which I don’t have.
I make my own pastrami occasionally, can you share your recipe?

I brine briskets for 4 to 7 days, coat with a 50-50 blend of crushed and roasted black peppercorns an coriander, then smoke for a couple of hours then seal them in a vacuum bag and steam until internal temp reaches 180.

here's the brine I use:

1616514780437.png
 

Plan9Misfit

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Pastrami Recipe

(1) 3.5-4 Lb flat brisket (or Navel beef) - trimmed
3 quarts (14.5 cups) of water, divided (Freeze one half)
1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
2/3 cup Kosher salt
2 tablespoons ground black pepper
2 heaping tablespoons curing salt, Instacure #1 (aka Prague powder or saltpeter)
2 teaspoons whole coriander seeds
2 teaspoons yellow mustard seeds
2 teaspoons black peppercorns
2 teaspoons whole cloves
2 teaspoons juniper berries
1-2 teaspoons red chili flakes
1 cinnamon stick, crushed into pieces
8-10 whole allspice berries
8-10 garlic cloves - crushed
3 bay leaves, hand crushed

(You can also use the point of the brisket and not the flat. You’ll need to trim it down before it’s brined and smoked)

  1. Add half of the water and all of the ingredients into a pot. Bring to a boil to dissolve salt and sugar. Remove from heat and add the 1.5 quarts of ice to cool. Once temperature is cold, add brisket to the brine and leave it in the brine for 6-14 days to cure, turning the meat over every day. (I prefer to put the meat and brine in a 2.5 gallon ziplock or vacuum seal bag for 14 days)
  2. When ready to smoke, remove the brisket and rinse off well in cold water. Discard brine. Season entire brisket liberally with 50/50 mix of ground coriander and coarse ground black pepper.
  3. Smoke the brisket at 225 degrees until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees (expect it to take 1.25 - 1.5 hours per pound).
  4. Once it reaches 150 degrees, pull the brisket off the smoker.
  5. Place the brisket in a restaurant steamer and steam it in a 225 degree oven until it reaches an internal temperature of 202 degrees. (Be sure to cover the top of the steamer in saran wrap and then aluminum foil before putting the steamer lid on. Trust me)
  6. Wrap it in butcher paper, and let it rest for 45-60 minutes. Thinly slice against the grain and serve.
 

yimyammer

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@yimyammer what kind of vacuum bags are you using?
I use these:

1616523003025.png

My favorite kitchen tool is this badass machine:

1616523034806.png

I buy all kinds of stuff in bulk, seal and freeze. I also grind my own beef with a nice fat grind from a blend of sirloin/chuck/brisket and seal grind:

1616523190683.png

1616523217857.png

Its paid for itself in savings and next to no spoilage
 

yimyammer

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Messages
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Pastrami Recipe

(1) 3.5-4 Lb flat brisket (or Navel beef) - trimmed
3 quarts (14.5 cups) of water, divided (Freeze one half)
1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
2/3 cup Kosher salt
2 tablespoons ground black pepper
2 heaping tablespoons curing salt, Instacure #1 (aka Prague powder or saltpeter)
2 teaspoons whole coriander seeds
2 teaspoons yellow mustard seeds
2 teaspoons black peppercorns
2 teaspoons whole cloves
2 teaspoons juniper berries
1-2 teaspoons red chili flakes
1 cinnamon stick, crushed into pieces
8-10 whole allspice berries
8-10 garlic cloves - crushed
3 bay leaves, hand crushed

(You can also use the point of the brisket and not the flat. You’ll need to trim it down before it’s brined and smoked)

  1. Add half of the water and all of the ingredients into a pot. Bring to a boil to dissolve salt and sugar. Remove from heat and add the 1.5 quarts of ice to cool. Once temperature is cold, add brisket to the brine and leave it in the brine for 6-14 days to cure, turning the meat over every day. (I prefer to put the meat and brine in a 2.5 gallon ziplock or vacuum seal bag for 14 days)
  2. When ready to smoke, remove the brisket and rinse off well in cold water. Discard brine. Season entire brisket liberally with 50/50 mix of ground coriander and coarse ground black pepper.
  3. Smoke the brisket at 225 degrees until internal temperature reaches 150 degrees (expect it to take 1.25 - 1.5 hours per pound).
  4. Once it reaches 150 degrees, pull the brisket off the smoker.
  5. Place the brisket in a restaurant steamer and steam it in a 225 degree oven until it reaches an internal temperature of 202 degrees. (Be sure to cover the top of the steamer in saran wrap and then aluminum foil before putting the steamer lid on. Trust me)
  6. Wrap it in butcher paper, and let it rest for 45-60 minutes. Thinly slice against the grain and serve.
good stuff, when you steam, are you exposing the meat to the steam or does the plastic create a barrier?

Looks like I should let mine steam to a higher temperature next time. Please posts some pics the next time you do your thing.

By the way, I was watching a special online about Katz's and they use the Navel for their pastrami. I called a supplier thinking it would be a cheaper cut but was much more expensive than brisket

Here's the notes I took from that show:

Katz’s Pastrami
Its made from the navel
Cures 30 days
Smoked from 7 to 72 hours
Rub is salt, pepper, garlic & coriander
Final step is to steam until soft



Here is the tastiest Pastrami you can buy, a cornerstone of Katz's meat offerings and a memorable excursion into deli sandwich luxury. Our incredibly tender, melt-in-your-mouth pastrami doesn't get this way by chance - here's a glimpse into the rigorous process:

1) First, we pickle the meat for 3 weeks in our secret brine solution
2) Then we apply a spice blend to the outside of the meat (aka. "the rub")
3) The meat is then slow-smoked for 3 days at a low, even temperature
4) Followed by boiling in our kitchen for 3 hours
5) And then steamed behind our carving counter
6) Finally, the pastrami is carved by hand by the most experienced deli staff on the planet.

So, this is no ordinary pastrami.

In the words of our talented, knife-wielding meat cutters behind the counter, "Who's Next?!"

Pasted Graphic.png
 

Plan9Misfit

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good stuff, when you steam, are you exposing the meat to the steam or does the plastic create a barrier?

Looks like I should let mine steam to a higher temperature next time. Please posts some pics the next time you do your thing.

By the way, I was watching a special online about Katz's and they use the Navel for their pastrami. I called a supplier thinking it would be a cheaper cut but was much more expensive than brisket

Here's the notes I took from that show:
I do both when I steam the pastrami. I bought a 8” (I believe) deep commercial roasting pan with a 4” deep steam tray insert so I can have the water bath directly below the tray. I then cover the pan with plastic wrap and aluminum foil to seal it and then put the lid on. It works pretty well, but obviously not as well as a true commercial steamer, but those are insanely expensive.

And, yeah, navel beef is more expensive than brisket, and it’s harder to find. If you can get it, use it. I can only find it at one butcher shop, and it’s 3x the price of brisket, so I never buy it. I just smoke the point of the brisket for BBQ and then turn the flat into pastrami.

I’ll likely make the pastrami this weekend, so I’ll post pictures of the final product. I also have a small deli meat slicer (6” blade), so I can slice it super thin.

And, if Katz is smoking the beef for 3 days before anything else, it has to be at like 100 degrees or otherwise it’ll cook the meat to completion. Boiling and steaming it after that would turn it into rubber, so it has to be well below a “finished” temperature.
 

skidadl

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Apr 7, 2004
Messages
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I’ve been hitting the smoker hard the last few weeks. Threw in a couple of butts for Easter. Today I have jalepeno stuffed bacon wrapped quail, wings and spare ribs. By the smoker truly is my happy place. Bought a flame boss 500 a few days ago. Sucker has the BGE just damn right.
 
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