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Thread: Korean leaders aim for end of war, 'complete denuclearization' after historic summit

  1. #1
    Senior Member mschmidt64's Avatar
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    Korean leaders aim for end of war, 'complete denuclearization' after historic summit

    Don't care how much you hate Trump. This is amazing and he deserves a ton of credit, along with China. They've essentially brow beat NK into the bargaining table. This is really amazing.

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    SEOUL (Reuters) - The leaders of North and South Korea embraced on Friday after pledging to work for the "complete denuclearization of the Korean peninsula", on a day of smiles and handshakes at the first inter-Korean summit in more than a decade.

    The two Koreas announced they would work with the United States and China this year to declare an official end to the 1950s Korean War and seek an agreement on "permanent" and "solid" peace.

    The declaration included promises to pursue phased arms reduction, cease hostile acts, transform their fortified border into a peace zone and seek multilateral talks with other countries including the United States.

    "The two leaders declare before our people of 80 million and the entire world there will be no more war on the Korean peninsula and a new age of peace has begun," the two sides.

    South Korean President Moon Jae-in agreed to visit the North Korean capital of Pyongyang this year, they said.

    Earlier, North Korea's Kim Jong Un became the first North Korean leader since the 1950-53 Korean War to set foot in South Korea after shaking hands with his counterpart over a concrete curb marking the border in the heavily fortified demilitarized zone.

    Scenes of Moon and Kim joking and walking together marked a striking contrast to last year's barrage of North Korean missile tests and its largest ever nuclear test that led to sweeping international sanctions and fears of war.

    Their meeting comes weeks before Kim is due to meet U.S. President Donald Trump in what would be the first ever meeting between sitting leaders of the two countries.

    Trump welcomed the Korean talks.

    "After a furious year of missile launches and Nuclear testing, a historic meeting between North and South Korea is now taking place. Good things are happening, but only time will tell!" he said on Twitter.

    He later added: "KOREAN WAR TO END! The United States, and all of its GREAT people, should be very proud of what is now taking place in Korea!"

    China, North Korea's main ally, welcomed the leaders' statement and said it was willing to keep playing a proactive role in promoting political solutions. China is wary of being sidelined by a thaw between the two Koreas and by the upcoming summit between Trump and Kim.

    Russia said it was ready to facilitate cooperation between North and South Korea, including in the fields of railway transport and energy.

    Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe also welcomed the summit and said he expected North Korea to take concrete steps to carry out its promises.

    Global markets were lifted by hopes the summit would pave the way for the end of conflict on the Korean peninsula. Shares in Seoul briefly rose more than 1 percent to a one-month high and Japan's Nikkei share average also gained.

    'BALL IN U.S. COURT'

    As part of efforts to reduce tension, the two sides agreed to open a liaison office, stop propaganda broadcasts and leaflet drops along the border and allow Korean families divided by the border to meet.

    Days before the summit, Kim said North Korea would suspend nuclear and long-range missile tests and dismantle its only known nuclear test site.

    But there has been widespread scepticism about whether Kim is ready to abandon the nuclear arsenal his country has developed for decades, justifying it as a necessary deterrent against U.S. invasion.

    "Everything will not be resolved in the blink of an eye," said Kim Young-hee, a North Korean defector-turned-economist at the Korea Development Bank.

    "Kim Jong Un has put the ball in the U.S. court. He declared denuclearization, and promised to halt nuclear tests," she said. "That tells us he wants the United States to guarantee the safety of his regime ... in return for denuclearization."

    It is not the first time leaders of North and South Korea have declared hopes for peace. Two earlier summits, in Pyongyang in 2000 and 2007, failed to halt the North's weapons program or improve relations in a lasting way.

    "We will make efforts to create good results by communicating closely, in order to make sure our agreement signed today before the entire world, will not end as just a beginning like previous agreements before today," Kim said after the agreement was signed.

    FIRST ACROSS THE LINE

    Earlier, Moon greeted Kim at the military demarcation line where the men smiled and shook hands.

    In an unplanned move, Kim invited Moon to step briefly across into North Korea, before the two leaders crossed back into South Korea holding hands.

    "I was excited to meet at this historic place and it is really moving that you came all the way to the demarcation line to greet me in person," Kim said, wearing his customary black Mao suit.

    "A new history starts now. An age of peace, from the starting point of history," Kim wrote in Korean in a guest book in the South's Peace House before talks began.

    During a private meeting in the morning, Kim told Moon he came to the summit to end the history of conflict and joked he was sorry for waking Moon up with his early morning missile tests, a senior presidential official said.

    Moon and Kim released their joint declaration before a dinner banquet.

    Later, with their wives, they watched a music performance and held hands as they watched a montage of photos from their summit set to a K-pop song that included the words "be a family again".

    After warm farewells, Kim was driven back to North Korea.

    The United States said earlier it was hopeful talks on peace and prosperity would make progress and it looked forward to discussions with South Korea in preparation for the planned meeting of Trump and Kim in coming weeks.

    Just months ago, Trump and Kim were trading threats and insults as the North made rapid advances in pursuit of nuclear-armed missiles capable of hitting the United States.

    The United States stations 28,500 troops in South Korea as a legacy of the Korean War, which ended in a truce, not a peace treaty. The war pitted the South, U.N. and U.S. forces against the communist North, backed by China and Russia.

    Kim and Trump are expected to meet in late May or June. Trump said on Thursday he was considering several dates and venues.

    (Reporting by the Inter-Korean Summit Press Corps, Christine Kim and Josh Smith; Additional reporting by Hyonhee Shin in SEOUL and David Brunnstrom and Susan Heavey and Eric Beech in WASHINGTON; Editing by Lincoln Feast, Robert Birsel)

  2. #2
    El Presidente' skidadl's Avatar
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    These are exciting times for sure. I'm hoping and praying that this goes well.

  3. #3
    Senior Member BipolarFan's Avatar
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    Does Trump deserve the credit for peace talks with North Korea?

    Claim: Donald Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-in agree the US President deserves credit for peace talks with North Korea.

    Verdict: Only the historical record will reveal what influenced these talks, but evidence suggests it was the South Koreans who encouraged dialogue with the North, along with pressure from Chinese enforced sanctions.

    Leaders of North and South Korea are expected to meet 27 April, for their third leaders' summit since the Korean War armistice was signed in 1953. Then in May or June, Donald Trump is expected to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, for the first ever meeting between a leader of the North and a sitting US president.

    After mounting tension and military threats traded between the US and North Korea, the historic talks may bring about a de-escalation of hostilities, as well as a peace treaty to end the 68-year Korean War.

    On 4 January 2018, US President Donald Trump tweeted: "With all of the failed 'experts' weighing in, does anybody really believe that talks and dialogue would be going on between North and South Korea right now if I wasn't firm, strong and willing to commit our total 'might' against the North. Fools, but talks are a good thing!"

    South Korean President Moon Jae-in said publicly too that President Trump deserved big credit for bringing about talks to discuss peace with the North. "It could be a resulting work of the US-led sanctions and pressure."

    US-led sanctions enforced by UN
    Since North Korea detonated its first nuclear test in 2006, the US and a number of allies imposed sanctions on North Korea. As well, the United Nations Security Council passed nine rounds of sanctions on North Korea - many of these proposed by the US.

    Over the years, these sanctions became more strict. The initial UN sanctions in 2006 banned the supply of heavy weaponry, missile technology and luxury goods. By December 2017, the UN sanctions restricted oil imports, metal, agriculture and demanded the deportation of North Koreans working abroad.

    While these most recent sanctions were US-led under the administration of President Trump, it may be China's recent enforcement of UN sanctions that hit North Korea hardest. China accounts for more than 90% of North Korea's trade, and while the Security Council member voted in favour of the UN sanctions against their long-time ally, they rarely upheld those, reports the Council on Foreign Relations. However, in this past year, China appears to have enforced the sanctions.

    Having already proved his military capabilities, Mr Kim is now turning his attention to economic growth, says Dr John Nilsson-Wright, a senior research fellow at Chatham House. So while the sanctions didn't stop Mr Kim from developing weapons, this latest development could hinder his economic plan for the long term.

    Tough talks and threats of military action
    On 2 January 2018, President Trump tweeted: "North Korean Leader Kim Jong-un just stated that the 'nuclear button is on his desk at all times'. Will someone from his depleted and food-starved regime please inform him that I too have a nuclear button, but it is a much bigger and more powerful one than his, and my button works."

    On 23 September 2017, President Trump tweeted: "Just heard [the] foreign minister of North Korea speak at [the] UN. If he echoes [the] thoughts of Little Rocket Man, they won't be around much longer."

    To compare, President Obama, in 2014, warned North Korea that "we don't use our military might to impose these things on others, but we will not hesitate to use our military might to defend our allies and our way of life".

    In 2016, President Obama told CBS News North Korea was "erratic enough" and "irresponsible enough that we don't want them getting close".

    "We could, obviously, destroy North Korea with our arsenals. But aside from the humanitarian costs of that, they are right next door to our vital ally, the Republic of Korea," he added.

    President Bush, for his part, labelled North Korea part of the "axis of evil."

    America has for years used words and threats of military might.

    The influence of South Korean engagement
    Two presidents prior to Moon Jae-in, Lee Myung-bak (2008-2013) took a hard-line approach to North Korea. The next president, Park Geun-hye (2013-2017), promised engagement with the North, a strategy that ended in early 2016 following missile and nuclear tests.

    In his inauguration speech, Mr Moon said he would "do everything I can to build peace on the Korean peninsula".

    This is a return to the Sunshine Policy of Presidents Kim Dae-Jung (1999-2003) and Roh Moo-Hyun (2003-2008), who were the only other two South Korean presidents to meet North Korean leadership - during the Inter-Korean Summits of 2000 and 2007. Kim Dae-jung won a Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts.

    "More credit should go to the South Koreans, because they actually made sure to have the North Koreans come to the Olympics and that was organised very very quickly," said senior lecturer Dr Virginie Grzelczyk, of Aston University. "The invitation to have the North Korean delegation and Kim Jong-un's sister…has been really critical to organise the summit that we are going to see at the end of the week."

    So why is the South giving credit to Trump?
    South Korea is acting strategically, says Dr Grzelczyk, to bring the Americans around to a place of dialogue "because both Koreas have at some point, been perplexed and concerned by American policy".

  4. #4
    Senior Member mschmidt64's Avatar
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    Zzzzzzzz

    Can’t take anyone seriously who can’t even find something good to say about the President after this.

  5. #5
    Senior Member mschmidt64's Avatar
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    What they should really do is go knock on Barack Obama’s door, ask for his fake Nobel Peace Prize back, and then scratch out his name and write in Donald J. Trump instead.

    Since that’s the person who has actually done something for world peace now, besides wear a sharp, well tailored suit and look like a model.

  6. #6
    Senior Member mschmidt64's Avatar
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    Seriously. If you’re the kind of person who is gonna troll the right after Obama nabbed Osama Bin Laden, then either prop Trump for playing a big role in this happening under his watch, or be exposed as a complete hypocrite douchebag.

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  8. #7
    One-armed Knife Sharpener Iamtdg's Avatar
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    Who gives a shit who gets credit? Furthe more, why would anyone give a shit if Trump gets credit for it? This is a monumental step for our national security and for the people of South Korea. Can we not just be happy about that? My god.
    2016 DCC LOTY Fantasy Football Champion

  9. #8
    Senior Member Kbrown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mschmidt64 View Post
    Seriously. If you’re the kind of person who is gonna troll the right after Obama nabbed Osama Bin Laden, then either prop Trump for playing a big role in this happening under his watch, or be exposed as a complete hypocrite douchebag.
    Even if Trump had a minimal direct role in this, it is laughable to think back a few months ago when he was the cunt about to bring about the nuclear apocalypse.

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  11. #9
    Senior Member BipolarFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iamtdg View Post
    Who gives a shit who gets credit? Furthe more, why would anyone give a shit if Trump gets credit for it? This is a monumental step for our national security and for the people of South Korea. Can we not just be happy about that? My god.
    Agreed.

    I just don't see what Trump has done to deserve any credit unless you count trading insults with little Jung.

  12. #10
    One-armed Knife Sharpener Iamtdg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BipolarFan View Post
    Agreed.

    I just don't see what Trump has done to deserve any credit unless you count trading insults with little Jung.
    Trump sent Pompeo to NK. That doesn't count?
    2016 DCC LOTY Fantasy Football Champion

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