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Thread: Trump fires FBI Director James Comey.

  1. #391
    Administrator boozeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L.T. Fan View Post
    I think I have made that my official stance Mr. booze.
    Yeah, I know.

    Recently, I used to think that stance was wise after teasing you for a while about it.

    Now, in this case, not so much.

    Politics are a lot different than football.

  2. #392
    Senior Member L.T. Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BipolarFan View Post
    Fired FBI Director James Comey has agreed to testify in an open hearing of the Senate Intelligence Committee, according to committee's leadership.

    Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Burr and Vice Chairman Sen. Mark Warner announced late Friday that Comey will testify in a hearing to be scheduled after Memorial Day. But Comey has declined to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee, which also extended him an invitation to testify, according to that committee's chairman and ranking member.

    The news comes at the tail end of a whirlwind day in Washington, following reports that President Trump told Russian diplomats he fired "nut job" Comey to "relieve pressure" from the Russia investigation, and that a senior White House adviser is a target of the law enforcement investigation into any ties between Russia and Trump associates.

    Earlier in the week, reports emerged that Mr. Trump divulged sensitive information to Russian diplomats and told Comey to drop the FBI investigation into ousted national security adviser Michael Flynn.

    Comey's expected testimony also comes after Attorney General Rod Rosenstein announced the selection of former FBI Director Robert Mueller as special counsel overseeing the FBI's Russia investigation.

    "The committee looks forward to receiving testimony from the former director on his role in the development of the Intelligence Community Assessment on Russian interference in the 2016 US elections, and I am hopeful that he will clarify for the American people recent events that have been broadly reported in the media," Burr, a Republican, said in a statement.

    Warner was slightly more specific, hoping Comey can answer events surrounding the president's actions.

    "I hope that former Director Comey's testimony will help answer some of the questions that have arisen since Director Comey was so suddenly dismissed by the President," Warner, a Democrat, said. "I also expect that Director Comey will be able to shed light on issues critical to this committee's investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election. Director Comey served his country with honor for many years, and he deserves an opportunity to tell his story. Moreover, the American people deserve an opportunity to hear it."

    Pressure is mounting in Congress -- especially among Republicans -- to scrutinize Mr. Trump's investigation in light of the rapid-fire sequences of events taking place since Comey's firing more than a week ago.
    Do they really expect him to reverse himself from what he has already testified to? How credible would that make him? There is a reason he doesn't want to go on record with the Senate judiciary Committee. They have members that will shred him to pieces.
    Since Day One

  3. #393
    Administrator boozeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L.T. Fan View Post
    Do they really expect him to reverse himself from what he has already testified to? How credible would that make him? There is a reason he doesn't want to go on record with the Senate judiciary Committee. They have members that will shred him to pieces.
    Well, maybe we should just wait and see.

  4. #394
    Senior Member L.T. Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boozeman View Post
    Well, maybe we should just wait and see.
    It is what I would prefer but we all know that will not happen. The process will continue of articles being posted that are full of conjecture and innuendo that some will take them as gospel which will in turn spark further pro and con commentary.

    The only thing that will alter anything will be official reports and even then they will not be accepted as the last word. That's just the nature of this group.

    I can wait for the process to run its course because I have conducted many investigations but we won't be afforded that outcome. So just stand by for the next salvo.
    Since Day One

  5. #395
    Senior Member BipolarFan's Avatar
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    Comey now believes Trump was trying to influence him, source says

    Former FBI Director James Comey now believes that President Donald Trump was trying to influence his judgment about the Russia probe, a person familiar with his thinking says, but whether that influence amounts to obstruction of justice remains an open question.

    "You have to have intent in order to obstruct justice in the criminal sense," the source said, adding that "intent is hard to prove."

    Comey will testify publicly before the Senate intelligence committee after Memorial Day, the panel's leaders announced Friday.

    The central question at that blockbuster hearing will be whether Comey believed the President was trying to interfere with his investigation.

    At a news conference Thursday, Trump angrily denied that he had asked Comey to end the investigation, which is now in the hands of new special counsel Robert Mueller. The President blasted the probe into Russia's involvement in the 2016 election and possible collusion with his campaign as a "witch hunt."

    Comey's view of Trump's intent in their conversations is nuanced, sources say. He initially believed that he could school the new President and White House in what was appropriate during their communications.

    But after his firing, the question of Trump's intent could become more problematic, one source said. Trump told NBC's Lester Holt in an interview that he was thinking "of the Russia thing" when he dismissed Comey.

    Sources say Comey had reached no conclusion about the President's intent before he was fired. But Comey did immediately recognize that the new President was not following normal protocols during their interactions.

    As The New York Times has reported, after numerous encounters with the administration, Comey felt he had to set the parameters of appropriate protocol very clearly. After the President asked Comey to let it be known publicly he was not under investigation, Comey told the President that if he wanted to know details about the bureau's work he should ask the White House counsel to communicate with the the Justice Department, according to the Times.

    According to one source with knowledge, Comey's relationship with Trump was uncomfortable from the start. The director had some hope that, over time, he could effectively point out the appropriate procedures and guidelines to both Trump and the White House staff about how the process of communications normally works. It didn't turn out that way.

    One Comey memo reportedly claims that Trump asked the FBI director to "let this go"-- referring to the FBI investigation into Gen. Michael Flynn's contacts with the Russians -- although the President himself has flatly denied that he ever did that.
    While it is unknown whether the President has either tapes or notes of his conversations with Comey, the FBI director kept meticulous memos and shared them with his team contemporaneously.

    Benjamin Wittes, editor in chief of the Lawfare blog and a Comey friend, writes that Comey called his interactions with Trump "training" in order to "re-establish" appropriate boundaries. In his conversations, Wittes writes, "Comey never specifically said this was about the Russia matter" but he assumed that it was. Comey saw his job, Wittes writes, as an effort to "protect the rest of the bureau from improper contacts and interferences from a group of people he did not regard as honorable."

    Wittes told The New York Times that the now-infamous hug from the President -- from which Comey tried to hide behind a blue curtain -- left the director "disgusted." Wittes writes "he regarded the episode as a physical attempt to show closeness and warmth in a fashion calculated to compromise him before Democrats who already mistrusted him."

    The dinner with the President, which Wittes describes as "the loyalty dinner," took place five days after that hug.

  6. #396
    Senior Member L.T. Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BipolarFan View Post
    Former FBI Director James Comey now believes that President Donald Trump was trying to influence his judgment about the Russia probe, a person familiar with his thinking says, but whether that influence amounts to obstruction of justice remains an open question.

    "You have to have intent in order to obstruct justice in the criminal sense," the source said, adding that "intent is hard to prove."

    Comey will testify publicly before the Senate intelligence committee after Memorial Day, the panel's leaders announced Friday.

    The central question at that blockbuster hearing will be whether Comey believed the President was trying to interfere with his investigation.

    At a news conference Thursday, Trump angrily denied that he had asked Comey to end the investigation, which is now in the hands of new special counsel Robert Mueller. The President blasted the probe into Russia's involvement in the 2016 election and possible collusion with his campaign as a "witch hunt."

    Comey's view of Trump's intent in their conversations is nuanced, sources say. He initially believed that he could school the new President and White House in what was appropriate during their communications.

    But after his firing, the question of Trump's intent could become more problematic, one source said. Trump told NBC's Lester Holt in an interview that he was thinking "of the Russia thing" when he dismissed Comey.

    Sources say Comey had reached no conclusion about the President's intent before he was fired. But Comey did immediately recognize that the new President was not following normal protocols during their interactions.

    As The New York Times has reported, after numerous encounters with the administration, Comey felt he had to set the parameters of appropriate protocol very clearly. After the President asked Comey to let it be known publicly he was not under investigation, Comey told the President that if he wanted to know details about the bureau's work he should ask the White House counsel to communicate with the the Justice Department, according to the Times.

    According to one source with knowledge, Comey's relationship with Trump was uncomfortable from the start. The director had some hope that, over time, he could effectively point out the appropriate procedures and guidelines to both Trump and the White House staff about how the process of communications normally works. It didn't turn out that way.

    One Comey memo reportedly claims that Trump asked the FBI director to "let this go"-- referring to the FBI investigation into Gen. Michael Flynn's contacts with the Russians -- although the President himself has flatly denied that he ever did that.
    While it is unknown whether the President has either tapes or notes of his conversations with Comey, the FBI director kept meticulous memos and shared them with his team contemporaneously.

    Benjamin Wittes, editor in chief of the Lawfare blog and a Comey friend, writes that Comey called his interactions with Trump "training" in order to "re-establish" appropriate boundaries. In his conversations, Wittes writes, "Comey never specifically said this was about the Russia matter" but he assumed that it was. Comey saw his job, Wittes writes, as an effort to "protect the rest of the bureau from improper contacts and interferences from a group of people he did not regard as honorable."

    Wittes told The New York Times that the now-infamous hug from the President -- from which Comey tried to hide behind a blue curtain -- left the director "disgusted." Wittes writes "he regarded the episode as a physical attempt to show closeness and warmth in a fashion calculated to compromise him before Democrats who already mistrusted him."

    The dinner with the President, which Wittes describes as "the loyalty dinner," took place five days after that hug.
    ~Snicker~
    Since Day One

  7. #397
    Banned townsend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L.T. Fan View Post
    If the evidence were obtained and proven then I absolutely would be for the due process to commence that was approproiate to the evidence presented. In the instant case it would be in the form of documents, recorded conversations or any format that conclusively displayed that anyone with the Trump campaign and or Trump himself were part of a scheme to affect the election outcome.

    It would have to be focused on the election process and identify individuals specifically. Just having contact or conversations about business interest or common concerns would not be an adequate threshold. It would have to deal specifically with plans or schemes to affect election results.
    That seems reasonable.

  8. #398
    Senior Member 2233boys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowboysrock55 View Post
    Yep, all of this is probably true as well.

    The Estate Tax just bugs me. And I know the idea is that we are trying to prevent wealthy families from just handing down all of their wealth to the next in line. But I also just think it's bullshit to tax someone twice. You're really just taxing their money twice and punishing them for giving the money to a child as opposed to a charity or some other entity. If you tax income correctly when it comes in there wouldn't be any need to tax it again when the person dies.
    You have a point about the estate tax being a double tax, but it only affects the top .02 of the wealthiest people in the country. If the tax code was correct on the front end, it likely wouldn't be necessary.

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