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Thread: President Trump Thread...

  1. #6941
    Senior Member bbgun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boozeman View Post
    I don't buy that for a second. I doubt many people who were motivated to get off their ass and vote Obama would turn right back around four years later and vote Trump.
    Oh, I'm sure plenty of white men did. They're fleeing the Dem party in droves. Trump doesn't win Penn, Wisc or Michigan without their support.
    Last edited by bbgun; 07-05-2018 at 12:36 PM.

  2. #6942
    Administrator boozeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbgun View Post
    Oh, I'm sure plenty of white men did. They're fleeing the Dem party in droves. Trump doesn't win Penn, Wisc or Michigan withhold their support.
    The specific kind of white guy you are talking about probably sat out the previous election due to learned helplessness.

  3. #6943
    One-armed Knife Sharpener Iamtdg's Avatar
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    Keep calling all of us trash. You can enjoy Trump as President for 4 more years come 2020.
    2016 DCC LOTY Fantasy Football Champion

  4. #6944
    Senior Member BipolarFan's Avatar
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    Trump’s trade war with China is finally here — and it won’t be pretty

    Some said the day would never come, that it was all a bluff. But as the Independence Day fireworks cool in Washington, the eve of the trade war has arrived in China’s capital, where government leaders keep reminding people: We did not start this, but we will fight back.

    President Trump’s first tariffs are scheduled to hit $34 billion of Chinese imports on Friday, and Beijing plans to swiftly respond with levies on an equal amount of goods. Border officers here could receive the order as early as midnight to slap new taxes on hundreds of American products, including pork, poultry, soybeans and corn.

    And so would begin an unprecedented commerce battle between the world’s two largest economies — a conflict analysts fear could rattle markets, cripple trade and undermine ties between the United States and China at a time when the administration seeks Beijing’s cooperation on North Korea.

    As the global business community watches the clock, China is moving to pin the fallout on Trump, framing the United States as a bully the Asian nation is forced to confront. A state media editorial this week called America’s “dictatorial bent” a global threat, while officials said China will “absolutely not” take the first swing.

    “As long as the U.S. side rolls out its tariffs list, China will respond with all necessary measures to firmly safeguard our legitimate rights and interests,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang told reporters Wednesday.

    Those measures appear to be aimed at America’s heartland, which helped lift Trump into the White House. Farmers in the overwhelmingly red Midwest fear they’ll lose access to China’s lucrative market and be left with the bill for excess produce and livestock.

    What happens next is anyone’s guess, analysts say, since both sides have pledged not to back down.

    “It’s a dark day tomorrow for global trade,” predicted Joerg Wuttke, former president of the European Union Chamber of Commerce in China.

    Uncertainty hangs over companies, supply chains and investment plans, he said. American firms in China are already reporting spikes in random inspections at ports.

    One U.S. manufacturer said Chinese authorities on average used to inspect 2 percent of the vehicles it sent abroad. Since June, agents have taken a closer look at every product.

    “Don’t expect the ‘war’ to be out in the open in some imaginary tit-for-tat tariff battlefield,” said James Zimmerman, a partner in the Beijing office of international law firm Perkins Coie LLP. “The real battle will be on the flanks”— in the form of unnecessary inspections, product quarantines and heightened regulatory scrutiny.

    Supply chains will also suffer a blow, said Cliff Tan, East Asian head of Global Markets Research at Japan’s MUFG Bank in Hong Kong. The initial set of American tariffs could rock companies in the technology sector and hike the price of “Walmart-type” products.

    “It’s like a war where everybody points the guns at themselves,” Tan said.

    The conflict over U.S.-China trade has been brewing for years, but has intensified rapidly in 2018. On April 3, the U.S. released a list of targets for proposed tariffs on $50 billion worth of Chinese imports, taking aim at high-tech and industrial goods. On April 4, China fired back.

    In the months since, the tit-for-tat has escalated, with the U.S. threatening successive rounds of tariffs on goods valued at hundreds of billions of dollars. China vowed to match U.S. moves, using both quantitative and qualitative measures.

    Kenneth Jarrett, president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai, said that a sense of anxiety has settled over business in the port city.

    “My hope is that with this start, people will feel that the cost is too great and we will not move on to the second wave,” he said.

    Thus far, the U.S. president has showed no interest in a last-minute truce. Though he has called Chinese President Xi Jinping a “good friend,” he has expressed no apprehension over what could happen in either country when the first tariffs land.

    “Trade wars are good,” Trump recently tweeted, “and easy to win.”

  5. #6945
    Senior Member Cowboysrock55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boozeman View Post
    I don't buy that for a second. I doubt many people who were motivated to get off their ass and vote Obama would turn right back around four years later and vote Trump.
    I don't know about that. I think a lot of people who voted for Obama were motivated by making history and being part of the group that elected America's first African American president. I could see a lot of those people feeling left out and abandoned by the last administration, enough so that they got out and voted for Trump.

  6. #6946
    Senior Member L.T. Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BipolarFan View Post
    Some said the day would never come, that it was all a bluff. But as the Independence Day fireworks cool in Washington, the eve of the trade war has arrived in China’s capital, where government leaders keep reminding people: We did not start this, but we will fight back.

    President Trump’s first tariffs are scheduled to hit $34 billion of Chinese imports on Friday, and Beijing plans to swiftly respond with levies on an equal amount of goods. Border officers here could receive the order as early as midnight to slap new taxes on hundreds of American products, including pork, poultry, soybeans and corn.

    And so would begin an unprecedented commerce battle between the world’s two largest economies — a conflict analysts fear could rattle markets, cripple trade and undermine ties between the United States and China at a time when the administration seeks Beijing’s cooperation on North Korea.

    As the global business community watches the clock, China is moving to pin the fallout on Trump, framing the United States as a bully the Asian nation is forced to confront. A state media editorial this week called America’s “dictatorial bent” a global threat, while officials said China will “absolutely not” take the first swing.

    “As long as the U.S. side rolls out its tariffs list, China will respond with all necessary measures to firmly safeguard our legitimate rights and interests,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang told reporters Wednesday.

    Those measures appear to be aimed at America’s heartland, which helped lift Trump into the White House. Farmers in the overwhelmingly red Midwest fear they’ll lose access to China’s lucrative market and be left with the bill for excess produce and livestock.

    What happens next is anyone’s guess, analysts say, since both sides have pledged not to back down.

    “It’s a dark day tomorrow for global trade,” predicted Joerg Wuttke, former president of the European Union Chamber of Commerce in China.

    Uncertainty hangs over companies, supply chains and investment plans, he said. American firms in China are already reporting spikes in random inspections at ports.

    One U.S. manufacturer said Chinese authorities on average used to inspect 2 percent of the vehicles it sent abroad. Since June, agents have taken a closer look at every product.

    “Don’t expect the ‘war’ to be out in the open in some imaginary tit-for-tat tariff battlefield,” said James Zimmerman, a partner in the Beijing office of international law firm Perkins Coie LLP. “The real battle will be on the flanks”— in the form of unnecessary inspections, product quarantines and heightened regulatory scrutiny.

    Supply chains will also suffer a blow, said Cliff Tan, East Asian head of Global Markets Research at Japan’s MUFG Bank in Hong Kong. The initial set of American tariffs could rock companies in the technology sector and hike the price of “Walmart-type” products.

    “It’s like a war where everybody points the guns at themselves,” Tan said.

    The conflict over U.S.-China trade has been brewing for years, but has intensified rapidly in 2018. On April 3, the U.S. released a list of targets for proposed tariffs on $50 billion worth of Chinese imports, taking aim at high-tech and industrial goods. On April 4, China fired back.

    In the months since, the tit-for-tat has escalated, with the U.S. threatening successive rounds of tariffs on goods valued at hundreds of billions of dollars. China vowed to match U.S. moves, using both quantitative and qualitative measures.

    Kenneth Jarrett, president of the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai, said that a sense of anxiety has settled over business in the port city.

    “My hope is that with this start, people will feel that the cost is too great and we will not move on to the second wave,” he said.

    Thus far, the U.S. president has showed no interest in a last-minute truce. Though he has called Chinese President Xi Jinping a “good friend,” he has expressed no apprehension over what could happen in either country when the first tariffs land.

    “Trade wars are good,” Trump recently tweeted, “and easy to win.”
    With all the brilliant ideas of the writers on the left, why weren’t some of these jeweled thoughts channeled to the left leaders and more specifically to Obama to create a dazzling group of trade agreements. All the current activities could have been averted and it would be smooth sailing for the democratic candidate in the last election. Why is it that they can be almost clairvoient now with their writing skills.
    Since Day One

  7. #6947
    Senior Member Chocolate Lab's Avatar
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    I thought it was pretty much established fact that many swing voters in the upper midwest (as BB said) voted for Obama at least the first time (and maybe the second), then swung to Trump.

    Despite all the ideological screaming on Twitter, most voters don't care about the SJW wars. They want a better economy for themselves and their families. So they voted Obama after the financial meltdown and Trump after Obama's feeble recovery.
    2014=2009, 2015=2010?

    The Garrett Song

  8. #6948
    Senior Member Cowboysrock55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chocolate Lab View Post
    I thought it was pretty much established fact that many swing voters in the upper midwest (as BB said) voted for Obama at least the first time (and maybe the second), then swung to Trump.

    Despite all the ideological screaming on Twitter, most voters don't care about the SJW wars. They want a better economy for themselves and their families. So they voted Obama after the financial meltdown and Trump after Obama's feeble recovery.
    Yep, in the end the economy is really what's most important when it comes to government policy.

  9. #6949
    One-armed Knife Sharpener Iamtdg's Avatar
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    2016 DCC LOTY Fantasy Football Champion

  10. #6950
    One-armed Knife Sharpener Iamtdg's Avatar
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