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Thread: Teacher: I love my students, I love my job, and I feel fulfilled. But Im broke.

  1. #21
    Senior Member Cowboysrock55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggyfly View Post

    And what type of jobs do you think you cn get over the summer that up your yearly income that much?
    I guess it sort of depends where you live. For example I live at a Lake. Bartenders over the summer here can make a fortune. Obviously that doesn't apply everywhere. But I know a husband and wife teaching combo who both do that here and they do very well. I think most teachers get pretty good benefits as well but I can't speak nationwide to that. Obviously every state is different.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Jiggyfly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowboysrock55 View Post
    So wait, $57,000.00 per year isn't a living wage anymore?
    Who gets 57,000?

    There are only 20 states out 50 that average that and notice I said average.

    http://www.teacherportal.com/teacher-salaries-by-state/

    Average starting salary is 35,000.

    A teacher gets about 1,000 a year bump in pay if any depending on school budgets.

    The average salary in your state is 47,000 with a starting salary of 30,000.

    To me it's not about a living wage it's about attracting the best and brightest yes you can live on these wages but can you keep and get the best teachers with these wages.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Jiggyfly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowboysrock55 View Post
    K-5 teacher overload: Too many trained, not enough jobs
    Emma Beck, USA TODAY 11:14 a.m. EST February 19, 2013
    But shortages remain in math, science and special education.

    elementary school classroom
    (Photo: Charles Rex Arbogast, AP)
    STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    Experts say colleges and universities don't make the effort to match supply and demand
    Budget cuts, hiring freezes and delayed retirements are shrinking the pool of positions
    There were 1,708,057 elementary school teachers in 2010, a decrease from 1,774,295 in 2009
    The nation is training twice as many K-5 elementary school teachers as needed each year, while teacher shortages remain in the content specific areas of math, science and special education.

    Illinois trained roughly 10 teachers for every one position available, according to an estimate by the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ), a Washington based research and policy group.
    In New York, about 6,500 childhood education specialists were trained in 2010 to fill the projected demand of 2,800 in 2011, according to the state's education department and labor bureau.
    Public elementary schools in Cherry Hill, N.J., average 400 to 600 applicants for one full-time position; the numbers are up to 400 for work as a long-term substitute, said George Guy, the principal for A. Russell Knight Elementary School.
    NCTQ president Kate Walsh says the market is "flooded with elementary teachers" because universities and colleges don't make the effort to match supply and demand as other professions might do. Dean Donald Heller of Michigan State's College of Education says it is true that MSU does not coordinate with the state regarding how many elementary school teachers are needed. But the school produces teachers for a nationwide market, not specifically for Michigan, he countered.

    The National Center for Education Statistics reported there were 1,708,057 elementary school teachers in 2010, the most recent year for which statistics are available, a decrease from 1,774,295 in 2009.

    "For those coming out of college, getting a full- time position immediately is not going to happen," Guy said.

    A combination of state budget cuts, hiring freezes and teachers delaying retirement has shrunk the pool of open elementary teacher positions, Guy said. New Jersey Republican Gov. Chris Christie slashed $828 million in 2010 for K-12 school funding in an effort to balance the state's deficit. In Cherry Hill, 70 non-tenured positions were cut; Guy says the district still hasn't recovered.

    The future elementary teacher job outlook may not be as bleak. A 2012 Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimates a 17% increase in teacher employment from 2010 to 2020, citing higher enrollment and decline in student-teacher ratios. The growth is expected to be concentrated largely in the South and West, the BLS reports.

    Though the oversupply of elementary education teachers persists, shortages remain in math, science and special education. Content certification in these low-staffed areas requires additional credits and hours, a discouragement for some to pursue the endorsement, said Doug Peden, the executive director of the Ohio based American Association for Employment in Education.

    The Clark County School district in Clark County, Nev., presently holds 36 math vacancies, 22 science vacancies and 92 special education vacancies out of a force of 17,000 teachers, the district's press secretary, Melinda Malone, said.

    The Richland School District Two in Columbia, S.C., has similar perennial shortages for math, science and special education teachers. "We have been able to fill our vacancies… However, each year we must work diligently to find suitable applicants," said Karen Lovett, the school district's executive director of human resources.

    Greater communication between universities and school districts would help level supply and demand, said Richelle Patterson, a senior policy analyst at the National Education Association, a labor union that works to advance public education. "If the districts (students) want to work in have no turnover, then school districts should translate that information to (university) preparation programs," she said.

    _______________________________________________

    I think part of this is a supply side as well. If you have too many people with teaching degrees, it suppresses wages.
    That's speaking to a specific area of teaching and even then it notes there are still areas of shortages.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/linda-..._12319698.html

    Teacher shortages have been much in the news. After years of layoffs during the fiscal recession, an upturn in the economy has allowed districts to begin hiring again. The problem is that many districts cannot find qualified teachers to fill the new positions. Headlines like these have appeared across the county in 2016:

    Help wanted: California school districts scramble to hire teachers

    Crisis hits Oklahoma classrooms with teacher shortage, quality concerns

    Florida teacher shortage labeled “critical”

    AZ teacher exodus leaves more than 1K Valley classrooms vacant

    Major teacher shortage causing big problems for 2016-2017 school year

    Teacher shortages were the topic of a recent gubernatorial debate in Indiana, with the Democratic challenger blaming the policies of the former governor for current shortages, while his Republican opponent pointed to a national crisis as a source of Indiana’s woes. With more than 40 states, plus the District of Columbia, reporting severe shortages in special education, math, and science, and states reporting the hiring of substitutes and individuals without credentials by the thousands, a national shortage seems plausible. Last spring, Indiana Governor Pence (now a vice-presidential candidate) signed into law a major scholarship bill subsidizing the preparation of prospective teachers in an effort to boost supply.
    Last edited by Jiggyfly; 11-05-2016 at 11:25 PM.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Jiggyfly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by L.T. Fan View Post
    The quality of the teachers is one topic closely followed by outcry of why they are not compensated as they should be. That is two parts of the same discussion. The passion ideology is fine but artists are passionate and musicians are passoniate as well but that doesn't automatically equate to being properly compensated. Teachers are in a field that unless it is a private system they are locked into a predetermined pay scale. No one is making a case that they shouldn't be better paid it's a matter of distribution of available funds. It is fine to be devoted and passionate but there is another issue in play so that can't just be ignored.
    Artist?

    Musicians?

    Really?

    Is that how you view teachers?

    I am still waiting to hear on how do kids get taught since teachers are so irrelevent.

    Are you advocating for private education for everyone?

  5. #25
    Senior Member Jiggyfly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowboysrock55 View Post
    I guess it sort of depends where you live. For example I live at a Lake. Bartenders over the summer here can make a fortune. Obviously that doesn't apply everywhere. But I know a husband and wife teaching combo who both do that here and they do very well. I think most teachers get pretty good benefits as well but I can't speak nationwide to that. Obviously every state is different.
    So how many bartending jobs are available?

    I am not saying there are not jobs available but what about pricing in child care and other variables.

    And how many of these jobs are going to be flexible and available every year.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Cowboysrock55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggyfly View Post
    Who gets 57,000?

    There are only 20 states out 50 that average that and notice I said average.

    http://www.teacherportal.com/teacher-salaries-by-state/

    Average starting salary is 35,000.

    A teacher gets about 1,000 a year bump in pay if any depending on school budgets.

    The average salary in your state is 47,000 with a starting salary of 30,000.

    To me it's not about a living wage it's about attracting the best and brightest yes you can live on these wages but can you keep and get the best teachers with these wages.
    I took the average weekly pay you posted and multiplied it by 52 weeks.

    Sounds to me like this is just as much an indictment of the process to get a teaching degree as anything.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Cowboysrock55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggyfly View Post
    So how many bartending jobs are available?

    I am not saying there are not jobs available but what about pricing in child care and other variables.

    And how many of these jobs are going to be flexible and available every year.
    Well our economy is a bit of a disaster so you might be right about there not being many jobs available. Here it isn't a problem but that's because the tourist industry during the summer here is crazy. And doesn't every profession have to deal with child care? That isn't unique to teaching and most jobs don't offer 2 to 3 months of vacation for people to take off the entire summer.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Plan9Misfit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowboysrock55 View Post
    So wait, $57,000.00 per year isn't a living wage anymore?
    Not in Southern California, it isn't. Unless you're single, with no dependents, no student loans, no debt, and have no desire to own property. Then, you're good to go.
    No Pat McQuistan = No Super Bowl. It's that simple.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Cowboysrock55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plan9Misfit View Post
    Not in Southern California, it isn't. Unless you're single, with no dependents, no student loans, no debt, and have no desire to own property. Then, you're good to go.
    And in the other 90% of America it's a great salary. If you're a teacher and that's what they pay in Southern Cal, go somewhere else.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Plan9Misfit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowboysrock55 View Post
    And in the other 90% of America it's a great salary. If you're a teacher and that's what they pay in Southern Cal, go somewhere else.
    I'm not disagreeing, but there's a reason why the educational system is going to shit, and part of it is directly correlated to salaries.
    No Pat McQuistan = No Super Bowl. It's that simple.

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