User Tag List

Page 12 of 14 FirstFirst ... 21011121314 LastLast
Results 111 to 120 of 137

Thread: The Home Improvement Thread

  1. #111
    ... soon midswat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,308
    I think that would be necessary if I was adding a line. All I’m doing is digging three feet down and replacing 2-3 foot of existing pipe. Last I checked, this is still merica so I can do that.

    Besides when the plumber was here and gave me the quote he said he could get started on it that day if I wanted. Made no mention of waiting to pull permits etc.

  2. #112
    Senior Member L.T. Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    17,156
    Quote Originally Posted by midswat View Post
    I think that would be necessary if I was adding a line. All I’m doing is digging three feet down and replacing 2-3 foot of existing pipe. Last I checked, this is still merica so I can do that.

    Besides when the plumber was here and gave me the quote he said he could get started on it that day if I wanted. Made no mention of waiting to pull permits etc.
    Then you didn’t need input after all. As they say on the Roller Coasters ride at your own risk.
    Since Day One

  3. #113
    ... soon midswat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,308
    Quote Originally Posted by L.T. Fan View Post
    Then you didn’t need input after all. As they say on the Roller Coasters ride at your own risk.
    Was seeking input on completing the job. Mostly with the re-packing under the driveway.

  4. #114
    Senior Member L.T. Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    17,156
    Quote Originally Posted by midswat View Post
    Was seeking input on completing the job. Mostly with the re-packing under the driveway.
    Okay. Get er done.
    Since Day One

  5. #115
    One-armed Knife Sharpener Iamtdg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    62,957
    Quote Originally Posted by midswat View Post
    Tree roots have grown into a break in my main sewer line in front of my home. Plumbers cleared it out and ran a camera up there and told me where it was located. Problem is it is about 6 inches inside, under my drive way.

    I asked how much something like that would cost to fix, and this guy told me $2600. Maybe more depending on nearby utilities. GTFOH. So I'm going to attempt to fix it myself. The drain is about 2 foot down, and I know the location of the break. My plan is to dig down carefully until I locate the exact location of the pipe. Then dig about 18" on each side. I'll have to tunnel underneath the driveway a little, but again it's only about 6-8 inches. Cut the roots back that I come across. Cut the busted section of pipe out, and using two couplers, put a new section of pipe in. Check for leaks, then throw dirt back on top. Been to Lowes and I think I have all that I need.

    Anyone ever do this? If so, any useful tips or error traps to avoid?

    Also, seeking advice on repacking the dirt back under the driveway. I don't want there to be a soft spot that could eventually lead to settlement cracks, etc. To avoid this - this is my potentially flawed plan - I bought a 60lb bag of gravel, and I have about 100lbs of concrete mix. I was going to pour those in the dug out section under the driveway. Would that work? I figured if I just tried to pack dirt under there, it might not get packed enough or leave air pockets. But if I poured cement down then that wouldn't be a problem.

    Any feedback is appreciated, amigos.
    One thing I have learned about is what is called a slide fitting. It makes repairing pvc much easier. The one in this video is not spring loaded but they make spring loaded ones so you don't have to clear out as much around the break. Here is a video and a link to what I am talking about.



    https://www.amazon.com/Orbit-35674-P...epair+coupling

    This one has a shark bite fitting. You don't have to have the one with the shark bite. I think the regular ones are cheaper.
    2016 DCC LOTY Fantasy Football Champion

  6. The following user likes this post:


  7. #116
    Senior Member jsmith6919's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    9,914
    Quote Originally Posted by Iamtdg View Post
    One thing I have learned about is what is called a slide fitting. It makes repairing pvc much easier. The one in this video is not spring loaded but they make spring loaded ones so you don't have to clear out as much around the break. Here is a video and a link to what I am talking about.



    https://www.amazon.com/Orbit-35674-P...epair+coupling

    This one has a shark bite fitting. You don't have to have the one with the shark bite. I think the regular ones are cheaper.
    They make repair couplings for the bigger 3"-4" drain sizes, it just a regular pvc coupling without the ridge insde in the center. So you can slide it all the way back on the existing pipe, put replacement section in place, then slide coupling into position. But I've used the rubber couplings in the past with no problems also.
    2018 DCC Super Bowl Bingo Champion

  8. The following user likes this post:


  9. #117
    One-armed Knife Sharpener Iamtdg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    62,957
    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith6919 View Post
    They make repair couplings for the bigger 3"-4" drain sizes, it just a regular pvc coupling without the ridge insde in the center. So you can slide it all the way back on the existing pipe, put replacement section in place, then slide coupling into position. But I've used the rubber couplings in the past with no problems also.
    I discovered these nifty little things the last time I had a leak out near my wellhouse. There is a huge Siberian Elm out there and one of the roots broke the pipe where another repair regular coupling was. At some point, some moron had poured a 20'X20' slab of concrete out there so I had to bust out about 3 feet of that concrete to get to the leak. That day sucked to say the least. Anyway, back on point, these type of repair couplings are extremely handy.
    2016 DCC LOTY Fantasy Football Champion

  10. #118
    ... soon midswat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    3,308
    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith6919 View Post
    They make repair couplings for the bigger 3"-4" drain sizes, it just a regular pvc coupling without the ridge insde in the center. So you can slide it all the way back on the existing pipe, put replacement section in place, then slide coupling into position. But I've used the rubber couplings in the past with no problems also.
    I got the rubber couplings and two of the pvc ones, but they have the ridge. Considered filing them down but I’ll probably just use the rubber ones and return the others.

  11. #119
    Senior Member jsmith6919's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    9,914
    Quote Originally Posted by midswat View Post
    I got the rubber couplings and two of the pvc ones, but they have the ridge. Considered filing them down but I’ll probably just use the rubber ones and return the others.
    Filing them down can be a bitch because then the whole inside the coupling gets roughed up which makes it hard to slide them. The rubber couplings are fine I'd just use them.
    2018 DCC Super Bowl Bingo Champion

  12. The following user likes this post:


  13. #120
    Senior Member 1bigfan13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    14,766
    Question for anyone with air conditioner/HVAC experience.

    I bought my home in May and moved into the home in June. I have a two system HVAC unit located in my attic and two outside condensers on one side of the house. On the opposite side of the house I have a couple of PVC pipes for a/c condensation drainage.

    There is a steady drip of water coming from the pipes. One drips a little more than the other. Typically I would consider this normal because I know one of the functions of an air conditioner is to pull moisture from the house. But my concern is that the ground is very marshy on the side of the house......like walking on a wet sponge of a yard. I don't know what's considered "normal" as far as drainage is concerned.

    As far as I can tell the a/c drain lines aren't clogged. I've used a wet vac to attempt to suck out any obstructions but nothing comes out of the pipes except a very small amount of water. I've poured vinegar into the upstairs drain lines to kill any algae that may be obstructing the lines. I change my filters regularly as well.

    So far the unit works fine and isn't giving me any problems. I'm just trying to identify potential problems before it becomes a major problem.

    Any thoughts?
    Last edited by 1bigfan13; 08-12-2018 at 05:08 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •