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  • Originally posted by Cowboysrock55 View Post
    I feel bad for Lamar Jackson. He is like representing himself as his own agent with his moms help. He's making weird moves like deciding not to run a forty. And frankly hearing him talk in an interview I could barely understand what he is saying. The guy is electric on the field but I just feel like maybe he isn't very bright and he is being led down some really bad paths. I mean the guy supposedly has legit 4.3-4.4 speed. Why in the hell wouldn't you showcase that to get drafted as high as possible? Just makes no sense to me.
    I like what he's doing. It's not like people don't know that he's fast. It pops on film when ever you see him. And when it comes to a number, WGAS if he's 4.3 or 4.4 when it's all said and done. He wants to be drafted strictly as a QB, not as a project WR, RB, or DB. I can respect that.

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    • Originally posted by NoDak View Post
      I like what he's doing. It's not like people don't know that he's fast. It pops on film when ever you see him. And when it comes to a number, WGAS if he's 4.3 or 4.4 when it's all said and done. He wants to be drafted strictly as a QB, not as a project WR, RB, or DB. I can respect that.
      You can't tell me Michael Vicks blazing forty didn't help him some.

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      • Originally posted by Cowboysrock55 View Post
        I feel bad for Lamar Jackson. He is like representing himself as his own agent with his moms help. He's making weird moves like deciding not to run a forty. And frankly hearing him talk in an interview I could barely understand what he is saying. The guy is electric on the field but I just feel like maybe he isn't very bright and he is being led down some really bad paths. I mean the guy supposedly has legit 4.3-4.4 speed. Why in the hell wouldn't you showcase that to get drafted as high as possible? Just makes no sense to me.
        He scores and sounds just like all the other big time prospects that have come out of South Florida over the years. Doesnít mean he canít play.

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        • Originally posted by Deuce View Post
          He scores and sounds just like all the other big time prospects that have come out of South Florida over the years. Doesn’t mean he can’t play.
          Yeah I know the kid can play. I also think he's a really good person. This isn't some cocky asshole kid. He is a good, humble person who wants to go out there and work hard and win games. I genuinely like him. I just think he'd be better off if he had a little help which it doesn't appear like he is getting. His mom is setting up team visits for fuck sake. And teams are complaining they can't get ahold of her to do it.

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          • Not sure what to make of this QB class. I think Darnold is the best, but not sure. I like Allen the best though...followed by Darnold, Mayfield, then Rosen.

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            • Originally posted by Carp View Post
              Not sure what to make of this QB class. I think Darnold is the best, but not sure. I like Allen the best though...followed by Darnold, Mayfield, then Rosen.
              See I like Rosen the best. My concern with him is injuries though. The guy already has concussion issues. But at the same time if can avoid injuries in the pros I think he is the perfect QB. Size, arm and accuracy. Plus he knows how to throw with touch or put heat on it when he needs to.

              I worry about Mayfield because every throw I see from college was to a wide open guy. I'd probably go Rosen, Darnold and then Mayfield. Allen would probably be next but I'm not sure I wouldn't have Jackson close behind him. Jackson has similar issues but he is a more electric player.

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              • If anyone wants Brugler's guide, PM me your email and I will send a copy to you.

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                • Originally posted by boozeman View Post
                  If anyone wants Brugler's guide, PM me your email and I will send a copy to you.
                  PM'd.

                  Comment




                  • Dude is so damn fast.
                    2016 DCC LOTY Fantasy Football Champion

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                    • Comment


                      • Originally posted by boozeman View Post


                        for both
                        #Fire Garrett

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                        • The NFL draft prospects who graded the highest in 2017


                          7:15 AM CT
                          Steve Palazzolo
                          Special to ESPN.com


                          Draft evaluation has long depended on the eyes of scouts -- who focus on traits, measurables and off-field assessments -- while on-field production is often a secondary component. But since Pro Football Focus started grading every snap of every college football game in 2014, early returns show that how well a prospect plays in college does project well to the NFL.

                          While it isn't as simple as taking the top-graded players and projecting a direct translation to the next level, it is a good starting point for evaluation when paired with traditional methods.

                          Here's a look at the top prospects who graded the highest on the field in 2017, and how they'll translate in the NFL.

                          Quarterbacks

                          Baker Mayfield, Oklahoma
                          Overall grade: 95.2

                          Mayfield has been in another league when it comes to throw-for-throw production, owning the top two season grades in the four years since PFF started tracking data. He's the most accurate quarterback in the draft, and has the arm strength and natural playmaking ability to succeed at the next level. Mayfield led the nation with an adjusted completion percentage of 80.6 last season and had the best grade from both a clean pocket and when facing pressure. No matter how the numbers are split, Mayfield sits at or near the top. That type of production makes him a high-end first-round pick.


                          Lamar Jackson, Louisville
                          Overall grade: 89.4

                          Jackson had the highest rushing grade among quarterbacks in each of the past two seasons. He's capable of making "NFL throws," but has to improve his throw-for-throw accuracy.



                          Mason Rudolph, Oklahoma State
                          Overall grade: 89.1


                          With three excellent years of production under his belt, Rudolph might be flying under the radar in this class. He's an excellent downfield thrower who needs to improve his short-area accuracy.


                          Kyle Lauletta, Richmond
                          Overall grade: 87.9

                          Lauletta has an outstanding feel in the middle of the field and at the intermediate level, where he posted the top PFF grade in the 2018 class. He has to improve his deep ball, which ranked 34th of 35 qualifiers in this draft.



                          Sam Darnold, USC
                          Overall grade: 86.0

                          It was more a three-game slump for Darnold in 2017 than a massive step back from an impressive redshirt freshman season in 2016. He ranked second in the class in big-time throw percentage, but also had the sixth-highest percentage of turnover-worthy plays as well.


                          Josh Rosen, UCLA
                          Overall grade: 85.3

                          Rosen never really dominated at UCLA, but he put together three solid years in the 84.0 to 86.0 range. He had the fourth-best grade in the class on intermediate throws, but needs to cut down on the poor decisions as he ranked 25th at avoiding turnover-worthy plays.

                          Running backs

                          Ronald Jones II, USC
                          Overall grade: 95.1

                          Jones was the best pure runner in the nation last season, leading the way with a 95.5 rushing grade. He has the vision, speed and short-area quickness to succeed in the NFL. He excels at maximizing the yardage given by his offensive line, ranking seventh in the nation with 914 yards after contact in 2017. Jones has yet to demonstrate that he can be a major factor in the passing game, catching only 32 passes in his career to go with four drops and only three missed tackles forced on those receptions. That might hurt his value at the next level, but Jones could be the best runner of the class and comes equipped with home run ability.


                          Kerryon Johnson, Auburn
                          Overall grade: 89.6

                          Johnson had a breakout season in 2017, breaking an impressive 50 tackles on only 285 carries. He was a workhorse for Auburn down the stretch, playing and battling through injury.


                          Rashaad Penny, San Diego State
                          Overall grade: 88.4

                          One of the most underrated running backs in the class, Penny posted the second-highest elusive rating at 128.6, breaking an incredible 86 tackles on only 290 carries last season.


                          Nick Chubb, Georgia
                          Overall grade: 88.2

                          Chubb had four excellent years of production at Georgia, averaging 3.7 yards after contact in his career. He's an offensive-line maximizer, always taking what is there and more from his blocking.


                          Saquon Barkley, Penn State
                          Overall grade: 88.2

                          Barkley is the premier weapon in the draft among running backs thanks to his receiving ability. He can create mismatches all over the field, though he has to improve his vision as a runner, as he does not always take what is given by his blocking.

                          Wide receivers

                          Michael Gallup, Colorado State
                          Overall grade: 92.0

                          No receiver has been more efficient than Gallup over the past two years, finishing 10th in the nation with an overall grade of 88.4 in 2016 before leading the way at 92.0 in 2017. His nuanced game allows him to separate at all levels of the field while creating space after the catch, where he has forced 38 missed tackles on his 179 catches in his career. Like many of the other receivers in this class, Gallup doesn't project as a classic No. 1 receiver, and if there's a complaint about his game, it's his inability to run away from defenders down the field. Still, his overall game lends itself to becoming a productive No. 2 receiver, and he's one of the best options in a class that is wide-open due to the lack of a true top talent.


                          Trey Quinn, SMU
                          Overall grade: 91.6

                          Quinn projects as more of a slot receiver who has a good feel for the game and can create separation when given a "two-way go." He led all FBS wide receivers with 4.66 yards per route from the slot last season.


                          Cedrick Wilson, Boise State
                          Overall grade: 89.2

                          Wilson is a nifty route runner who can win outside or in the slot. His 3.40 yards per route last year ranked seventh in the class.


                          James Washington, Oklahoma State
                          Overall grade: 88.7

                          The national leader with 815 yards on deep passes last season, Washington maintains his speed in and out of his breaks and has a second gear that allows him to win down the field.


                          Marcell Ateman, Oklahoma State
                          Overall grade: 87.9

                          Ateman uses his big, 6-foot-4 frame well, winning on slants and back-shoulder throws. He projects as a possession and red zone threat at the next level after ranking fourth in the class with 3.50 yards per route last season.

                          Tight ends

                          Dallas Goedert, South Dakota State
                          Overall grade: 96.8

                          Perhaps the best offensive mismatch weapon in the draft, Goedert dominated FCS, finishing 2017 with an impressive overall grade. Despite weighing 255 pounds, Goedert looks like a wide receiver with the ball in his hands and led all tight ends with 12 missed tackles forced while averaging 8.2 yards after the catch. He also knows how to use his long frame to make spectacular catches in one-on-one situations and in the red zone.



                          Mark Andrews, Oklahoma
                          Overall grade: 88.2

                          Andrews was more of a slot receiver at Oklahoma. He ranked second among tight ends with 2.63 yards per route, and led the way with 298 yards on deep passes.


                          Jordan Akins, UCF
                          Overall grade: 86.0

                          Akins has the speed to stretch the seam and improved his game every year at UCF. He averaged an impressive 6.4 yards after the catch and ranked fifth in the class with 1.93 yards per route in 2017.


                          Cam Serigne, Wake Forest
                          Overall grade: 85.1

                          A late-round option, Serigne runs the underneath routes well, and caught an impressive 77.2 percent of his targets last season while dropping only one of the 45 catchable passes thrown his way.


                          Deon Yelder, Western Kentucky
                          Overall grade: 84.9

                          Yelder has only one year of strong production, but ranked second in the class with five deep receptions for 177 yards. He has to catch the ball more consistently after dropping six passes on only 59 catchable targets last season.

                          Offensive linemen

                          Quenton Nelson, Notre Dame
                          Overall grade: 94.6

                          It's difficult to find any draft analyst who is not enamored with Nelson's game, and his all-around ability was evident in his high grade last season. He executes highlight-reel blocks in the running game, creating gaping holes at the point of attack, and is equally adept at locating defenders when asked to block on the move. Nelson improved in pass protection every year at Notre Dame, culminating in a 2017 season that saw him allow only five pressures on 430 pass-blocking attempts. Nelson is one of the best guard prospects in many years.


                          Frank Ragnow, Arkansas
                          Overall grade: 94.1

                          The nation's top-graded center in each of the past two seasons, Ragnow is an outstanding run-blocker who allowed only 15 pressures over the past two years.


                          Will Hernandez, UTEP
                          Overall grade: 90.3

                          Hernandez posted the top overall grade among guards in 2016 and the second-highest mark in 2017. He has allowed only four pressures over the past two seasons.


                          Mike McGlinchey, Notre Dame
                          Overall grade: 90.1

                          The nation's top run-blocking offensive tackle in 2017, McGlinchey has continued to improve in pass protection from year to year and has all of the tools to be the first tackle off the board.


                          Will Richardson, NC State
                          Overall grade: 89.5

                          An underrated offensive tackle in this class, Richardson allowed only five pressures last season to go with a strong run-blocking grade of 82.5.


                          Isaiah Wynn, Georgia
                          Overall grade: 89.0

                          A left tackle at Georgia, Wynn will likely move inside to guard at the next level. He allowed only five pressures in 2017 while ranking third in the nation with a run-blocking grade of 91.0.


                          Orlando Brown, Oklahoma
                          Overall grade: 88.4

                          A poor combine workout could see Brown drop in the draft, but he is a mauling run-blocker who graded at 90.4 last season, good for fourth in the nation.


                          Edge defenders

                          Justin Lawler, SMU
                          Overall grade: 91.0

                          When it comes to pure production, Lawler stood out above the rest in 2017. He doesn't have the desired measurables on the edge, which will likely push him down draft boards, but he deserves a chance in the NFL. Lawler posted the fourth-best grade in the nation as a pass-rusher on the strength of nine sacks, 10 quarterback hits and 36 hurries on only 356 rushes. He was just as efficient in the running game, blowing up blockers to the tune of the third-best grade among edge defenders. Lawler is a classic case of production versus athleticism, and it would not be a surprise to see him emerge as a valuable asset on a defensive line rotation if given the opportunity.


                          Joe Ostman, Central Michigan
                          Overall grade: 90.4

                          Another underrated rusher, Ostman notched 14 sacks, nine quarterback hits and 31 hurries on only 354 rushes last season.


                          Marcus Davenport, UTSA
                          Overall grade: 89.9

                          Davenport is a monster on the edge and his potential should see him drafted on Day 1. He ranked fourth in the class with a pass-rush productivity of 16.4 last season.


                          Bradley Chubb, NC State
                          Overall grade: 89.7

                          Chubb is getting hype as a top-five selection, but he's more of a good all-around player than an elite pass-rusher at this stage. He had the sixth-highest grade against the run and 11th-highest as a pass-rusher.


                          Ja'Von Rolland-Jones, Arkansas State
                          Overall grade: 88.4

                          An undersized edge defender, Rolland-Jones had an extremely productive career, finishing with 55 sacks, 30 quarterback hits and 117 hurries on 1,301 rushes. He'll likely get a look in the later rounds.


                          Shaquem Griffin, UCF
                          Overall grade: 88.2

                          While Griffin will be treated more as a traditional linebacker in the NFL, his best attribute is his ability to get after the passer. He had the seventh-best pass-rush grade on the edge last season, and 19 sacks, 13 quarterback hits and 51 hurries on only 476 rushes over the past two years.

                          Interior defensive linemen

                          Maurice Hurst, Michigan
                          Overall grade: 96.5

                          After two years of excellent play as part of Michigan's defensive line rotation, 2017 saw Hurst post the top grade we've seen from an interior defensive lineman in four years of grading (96.5). He's a classic, undersized disruptor who finished with the top pass-rushing grade and the second-best mark against the run last season. His first step, low pad level and quick hands make for a brutal combination for opposing offensive linemen to handle. Hurst looks like the next great interior disruptor in the mold of Aaron Donald, Mike Daniels and Grady Jarrett.


                          Vita Vea, Washington
                          Overall grade: 93.3

                          A massive, 340-pound nose tackle, Vea is one of the best disruptors in the running game and can get after the quarterback, pushing the pocket to the tune of an 87.6 pass-rush grade in 2017, the fourth-best mark in the nation.


                          Will Geary, Kansas State
                          Overall grade: 91.2

                          Geary is not a great athlete, but he's difficult to block and can fight through traffic as well as anyone in the class. He's disruptive in the running game and worth a look in the late rounds.


                          Harrison Phillips, Stanford
                          Overall grade: 90.6

                          Phillips is an excellent run defender, where his 90.9 grade ranked fourth in the nation. He also led the draft class with a run-stop percentage of 13.4.

                          Linebackers

                          Roquan Smith, Georgia
                          Overall grade: 90.6

                          Few linebackers possess Smith's all-around game. He ranked seventh in the class with a run-stopping grade of 87.8 while finishing second with an 88.5 coverage grade. He flies around the field making plays in all phases, and it's his coverage ability that makes him a perfect fit as a modern three-down linebacker. Smith has good range in zones, closing quickly and limiting big plays as he allowed only 5.7 yards after the catch on passes into his coverage over his career, a number that would have ranked second in the nation in 2017 alone. Smith should be the first linebacker off the board on Day 1.


                          Leighton Vander Esch, Boise State
                          Overall grade: 90.5

                          Vander Esch has the size and athleticism to make plays all over the field. He led the class with a run-stop percentage of 15.9 last year while grading at 85.1 in coverage.



                          Josey Jewell, Iowa
                          Overall grade: 87.9

                          Jewell has three-down potential at the next level after posting three straight years of grading at over 85.0 overall. He has 15 pass breakups and six interceptions in his career and was not charged with a touchdown into his coverage.



                          Dorian O'Daniel, Clemson
                          Overall grade: 87.6

                          O'Daniel showed great movement skills at the combine and is coming off an excellent all-around 2017 season that saw him grade at 85.7 against the run and 83.8 in coverage.

                          Cornerbacks

                          Josh Jackson, Iowa
                          Overall grade: 96.8

                          Jackson had only 297 snaps to his name coming into the 2017 season, but he dominated from start to finish, leading all cornerbacks in interceptions with eight and pass breakups with 17. He allowed a passer rating of only 31.3 on passes thrown into his coverage, the fifth-best mark in the nation among corners with at least 30 targets. Jackson has the size and ball skills to fit in any type of scheme, and while a 4.56 40-yard dash time is slower than most first-round hopefuls, Jackson's sound technique allows him to hang with receivers down the field.


                          Denzel Ward, Ohio State
                          Overall grade: 91.1

                          Ward's combination of straight-line speed and quickness is as good as it gets. He has the recovery speed to play the ball down the field and the lateral agility to cover the slot. Ward allowed a completion percentage of only 35.0 into his coverage over his career.


                          Darious Williams, UAB
                          Overall grade: 90.9

                          An overachiever who broke out in 2017, Williams allowed a passer rating of only 38.9 and a completion percentage of 31.9 into his coverage, both top-10 marks among cornerbacks in the nation.


                          D.J. Reed, Kansas State
                          Overall grade: 89.5

                          Reed is an undersized corner with two excellent years of production. He didn't allow a reception longer than 30 yards into his coverage last season.


                          Nick Nelson, Wisconsin
                          Overall grade: 88.8

                          Nelson broke out in 2017, allowing only 37.7 percent of passes to be completed into his coverage. His 16 pass breakups ranked second in the nation.

                          Safeties

                          Derwin James, Florida State
                          Overall grade: 92.2

                          The prototypical defensive player for today's NFL, James has the tools to become a chess piece in a versatile defensive scheme. He posted the top grade among safeties in his two healthy seasons: 91.2 as a true freshman in 2015 and 92.2 as a junior last season. James is a hammer against the run when playing close to the line of scrimmage, and has the physicality to hang with tight ends in man coverage and the quickness to hold his own against slot receivers. The trump card might be his ability to rush the passer, where he often lined up and beat offensive tackles one-on-one, finishing his college career with seven sacks, six quarterback hits and 25 hurries on only 111 rushes. James should be the first safety off the board, but it will take a creative defensive coordinator to maximize one of the draft's most unique skill sets.



                          Tarvarius Moore, Southern Mississippi
                          Overall grade: 87.2

                          Moore's athleticism allows him to break quickly on the ball and match up with receivers in one-on-one situations. He broke up nine passes and intercepted five more on only 53 career targets.


                          Natrell Jamerson, Wisconsin
                          Overall grade: 86.6

                          One of the better free safeties in the draft, Jamerson has an excellent feel for playing deep zones and tied for 14th in the country with six pass breakups last season.


                          Ronnie Harrison, Alabama
                          Overall grade: 85.9

                          Harrison does his best work closer to the line of scrimmage, where his run-stop percentage of 6.7 when lined up in the box ranked 10th in the class. He has an excellent feel for playing zone coverage and could fit into multiple schemes.


                          _____________________

                          Just thought it was an interesting take on the on field performance of some guys who we all really like.

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                          • Love Goedert, I'd be fine taking him at the end of the 1st if we traded down but it'll never happen.

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                            • Originally posted by Simpleton View Post
                              Love Goedert, I'd be fine taking him at the end of the 1st if we traded down but it'll never happen.
                              I'm with you. I think he could have just as much impact as a WR if we actually use him like our #1 TE.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Carp View Post
                                Not sure what to make of this QB class. I think Darnold is the best, but not sure. I like Allen the best though...followed by Darnold, Mayfield, then Rosen.
                                I like Darnold and Rosen. Feh to the rest.

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